Bursting the Bubble

Column: Economic Affairs

Articles published under Economic Affairs:

EU Women’s empowerment policy: In money we trust?

8 March 2017 | by Natàlia Segura

Gender equality intruded EU jargon in the past years.  Inequality between men and women started to be perceived as a form of discrimination touching many aspects of our lives (work, social position, relationships, education, politics, media, etc.), so gender mainstreaming infiltrated in many EU policies. For instance, the “Strategic engagement for gender equality 2016-19” was […]

The Political Economy of the Energy Union

13 February 2017 | by Rogier Van Vaerenbergh

In 2014 Juncker presented his vision on the European Energy policy, whereas we need to pool our resources, combine our infrastructures and unite our negotiation power with third countries. He established 4 pillars for an Energy Union: creating an Energy Union by pooling resources and connecting networks; diversifying energy sources; helping Member States becoming less […]

The Politics of the ECB

19 December 2016 | by Rogier Van Vaerenbergh

The European Central Bank (ECB) is the central bank for the euro and administers the monetary policy of the eurozone, which consists of 19 EU member states and is one of the largest currency areas in the world. It is one of the world’s most important central banks and is one of the seven institutions […]

EU Dumping Policy 3: NME, MES and the Linguistic Division of Labour

9 December 2016 | by Bjorn Delbeecke

China was the first hybrid economy with features of a non-market economy (NME) to accede to the WTO. A statement in its Accession Protocol says that the provision alluding to NME status will “in any event” expire fifteen year after its accession, on 11 December 2016. China therefore considers receiving market economy status (MES) as […]

EU Dumping Policy 2: China’s Market Economy Status

30 November 2016 | by Bjorn Delbeecke

A lot of attention currently goes out to the provisions of China’s WTO Accession Protocol dealing with, as it seems, an automatic expiry of its non-market economy status in December 2016. China claims that the provision which allows for an alternative method for calculating dumping margins will no longer apply fifteen year after its date […]