Bursting the Bubble

Column: Economic Affairs

Articles published under Economic Affairs:

EU Women’s empowerment policy: In money we trust?

8 March 2017 | by Natasha Marie Levanti

Gender equality intruded EU jargon in the past years.  Inequality between men and women started to be perceived as a form of discrimination touching many aspects of our lives (work, social position, relationships, education, politics, media, etc.), so gender mainstreaming infiltrated in many EU policies. For instance, the “Strategic engagement for gender equality 2016-19” was […]

EU Dumping Policy 3: NME, MES and the Linguistic Division of Labour

9 December 2016 | by Bjorn Delbeecke

China was the first hybrid economy with features of a non-market economy (NME) to accede to the WTO. A statement in its Accession Protocol says that the provision alluding to NME status will “in any event” expire fifteen year after its accession, on 11 December 2016. China therefore considers receiving market economy status (MES) as […]

EU Dumping Policy 2: China’s Market Economy Status

30 November 2016 | by Bjorn Delbeecke

A lot of attention currently goes out to the provisions of China’s WTO Accession Protocol dealing with, as it seems, an automatic expiry of its non-market economy status in December 2016. China claims that the provision which allows for an alternative method for calculating dumping margins will no longer apply fifteen year after its date […]

Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), and the World

11 October 2016 | by Rogier Van Vaerenbergh

Since the advent of the Bretton Woods System when the dollar was issued as an international reserve currency, Europeans especially the French, decried ‘le privilege exorbitant’ of the US. Indeed, the exorbitant privilege was used and misused throughout the 1960s, to pay for Johnson’s New Society and for the Vietnam war. This currency power has […]

EU Dumping Policy 1: The Fairness of the Analogue Country Method

20 September 2016 | by Bjorn Delbeecke

Anti-dumping legislation is based on the rhetoric of fairness. The underlying concern is that a foreign company with considerable market power in its home country could sell its products at a loss in Europe to drive out competitors and increase its prices afterwards. The goal of anti-dumping measures, therefore, is to increase import prices when […]